Friday, March 29, 2013

Blog Ring of Power Presents: S.J. Drum


Welcome to this week’s Blog Ring of Power guest, former zookeeper turned author S.J. Drum. S.J. writes Urban Fantasy/Paranormal Romance Novels, each with a bit of Steampunk flair. She writes an erotic series with tattooed heroes–first-in-series is SINFUL SOUTHERN INK (Ellora’s Cave 7-6-12).
She also writes LGBT Upper YA Dark Urban Fantasy under the pen name J.T. Fairfield. The first book in the Bayou Zoo series was released on 10/22/12, CAGED IN MYTH.
When she’s not changing diapers or writing, she enjoys scuba diving and has been known to make an elephant do a headstand.
You can find S.J. Drum on:

BRoPlogo-1

Don't forget to check out the rest of her interview with all of the other wonderful Blog Ring of Power Hosts

Part 1 @ Terri Bruce – http://www.terribruce.net, Wednesday, March 27th
Part 2 @ T.W. Fendley - http://twfendley.com/ Thursday, March 28th
Part 3 @Emily LaBonte - http://emlabonte.blogspot.com/ Friday, March 29th
Part 4 @ Sandra Ulbrich Almazon - http://ulbrichalmazan.blogspot.com/ Monday, April 1
Part 5 @ Dean C. Rich - http://deanswritingtime.blogspot.com/ Tuesday, April 2

So let's get to the questions.

Part 3: The Creative Process


BRoP:  How do you deal with writer’s block?
SJ:  I just say I’m “researching”. Ha! To say I have writer’s block feels like an admission of defeat.

BRoP:  Are you a “plotter” or a “pantser” (do you plan/outline the story ahead of time or write “by the seat of your pants”)?
SJ:  I’m an erratic plotter. Sometimes I’ll write a scene I know will be placed towards the end of the book, then I’ll work backward to the beginning.

BRoP:  Do you use critique partners or beta readers? Why or why not?
I haven’t much luck finding reliable beta readers. I do use a critique partner and she keeps me on target.

BRoP:  How much time do you spend on research? What type of research do you do?
SJ: For my LGBT New Adult Urban Fantasy, Caged in Myth, I read a lot of mythology related material. Whenever I’m attending a social function, I people watch and take notes on anyone interesting.

BRoP:  Is there anything you find particularly challenging to write?
SJ: I love reading historical fiction but the thought of writing one myself gives me hives




Caged in Myth by J.T. Fairfield
$0.99 on Amazon


*5 STAR REVIEW*
"I loved everything about this story, except that it had to end. Caged in Myth is a coming out story like no other. I would recommend you pick up this book, you won't be disappointed!" -Squibley's Fiction Addiction

*5 STAR REVIEW*
"I felt for Jay and his friends. The character development was sincere and intriguing." -Linda Hays-Gibbs, Author of My Angel, My Light as Darkness Falls and Review for The Romance Reviews


The Bayou Zoo, where magic is real, the beasts are deadly, and a bad day at work can literally mean the end of the world.

Octavian Julius McKellter— “Jay” to everyone who doesn’t want a punch in the face— struggles with keeping the secrets of his supernatural community and his own secret...he's gay. Throw in a dose of danger, deceit, and Louisiana heat, and you'll find yourself CAGED IN MYTH.



Friday, March 22, 2013

Blog Ring of Power Presents: Kate Evangelista


Well, it looks like it's Friday already! So while everyone begins their wind down time of this week's craziness, how about we take a visit from Author Kate Evangelista.  


When Kate Evangelista was told she had a knack for writing stories, she did the next best thing: entered medical school. After realizing she wasn’t going to be the next Doogie Howser, M.D., Kate wandered into the Literature department of her university and never looked back. Today, she is in possession of a piece of paper that says to the world she owns a Literature degree. To make matters worse, she took Master’s courses in creative writing. In the end, she realized to be a writer, none of what she had mattered. What really mattered? Writing. Plain and simple, honest to God, sitting in front of her computer, writing. Today, she has four completed Young Adult novels.



 The Creative Process


BRoP:  Where do you get your story ideas?

Kate:  I get my inspiration from everywhere and anywhere. I try to keep myself open. A lyric from a song. A scene in a movie. A line from a book. Anything can inspire me. I make sure to turn the inspiration into reality right away before it fades.

BRoP:  Do you have a specific writing style?

Kate: Right now? I’m really into alternating POVs. I love switching between the female and male protagonist of whatever story I’m currently working on. It allows me to explore so many different avenues in a story. Plus it helps me explore how the character thinks. It’s so much fun.

BRoP:  Are you a “plotter” or a “pantser” (do you plan/outline the story ahead of time or write “by the seat of your pants”)?

Kate:  I’m a write by the seat of my pants kind of girl. I take it a chapter or two at a time. Sometimes I start a story without knowing how it will end until I get to the middle. I find that when I outline, I end up forcing myself to stick to the outline and it stifles my creativity.

BRoP:  Do you use critique partners or beta readers? Why or why not?

Kate:  Having critique partners and beta readers is essential to my writing process. Getting their thoughts and using them as sounding boards allows me to see things about the story or characters that I didn't initially see while writing.

BRoP:  How much time do you spend on research? What type of research do you do?

Kate:  I don’t really do any in depth research. When I’m not clear about something while I’m writing, I Google it, but that’s the most I do. I stick to the facts within the world of the story. I find that too much research for me kills my world building. 

BRoP:  Is there anything you find particularly challenging to write?

Kate:  Horror. I’m easily scared. Which also means I can scare myself. So…writing horror is definitely out of the picture. I can put together scary scenes, but an entire scary book? *shivers*



Here's where you can find Kate:

Author Website: www.kateevangelista.com
Twitter: @KateEvangelista
Crescent Moon Press page for Taste: http://crescentmoonpress.com/books/Taste.html

Purchase Links:

Amazon:




Taste Trailer Full Download available at http://sheisnoelle.bandcamp.com


Taste Blurb:

At Barinkoff Academy, there’s only one rule: no students on campus after curfew. Phoenix McKay soon finds out why when she is left behind at sunset. A group calling themselves night students threaten to taste her flesh until she is saved by a mysterious, alluring boy. With his pale skin, dark eyes, and mesmerizing voice, Demitri is both irresistible and impenetrable. He warns her to stay away from his dangerous world of flesh eaters. Unfortunately, the gorgeous and playful Luka has other plans.

When Phoenix is caught between her physical and her emotional attraction, she becomes the keeper of a deadly secret that will rock the foundations of an ancient civilization living beneath Barinkoff Academy. Phoenix doesn’t realize until it is too late that the closer she gets to both Demitri and Luka the more she is plunging them all into a centuries old feud.



Reaping Me Softly Blurb:

Ever since a near-death-experience on the operating table, seventeen-year-old Arianne Wilson can see dead people. Just as she’s learned to accept her new-found talents, she discovers that the boy she’s had a crush on since freshman year, Niko Clark, is a Reaper.

At last they have something in common, but that doesn’t mean life is getting any easier. All while facing merciless bullying from the most powerful girl in school, Arianne’s world is turned upside down after Niko accidentally reaps the soul of someone she loves. This sends them both into a spiral that threatens to end Arianne’s life. But will Niko break his own Reaper’s code to save her? And what would the consequences be if he did?


Buy Links






To find the rest of Kate's interview, don't forget to check out the other members of the Blog Ring of Power



Part 1 @ Terri Bruce – http://www.terribruce.net on Wednesday, March 20th
Part 2 @ T.W. Fendley - http://twfendley.com/ on Thursday, March 21st
Part 3 @Emily LaBonte - http://emlabonte.blogspot.com/ Friday, March 22nd
Part 4 @ Sandra Ulbrich Almazon - http://ulbrichalmazan.blogspot.com/ Monday, March 25
Part 5 @ Dean C. Rich - http://deanswritingtime.blogspot.com/ Tuesday, March 26

Friday, March 15, 2013

Blog Ring of Power Presents: Beth Barany

Blog Ring of Power time! 

Whoot
Here she is, Beth Barany!

Welcome Beth, have a seat right here and we will get Part 5 rolling.


An author and speaker, Beth is the award-winning author of HENRIETTA THE DRAGON SLAYER, a young adult fantasy novel, and book 1 of the Five Kingdom series. Book 2 is coming in Spring 2013.
A certified Creativity Coach, Beth Barany is also the bestselling author ofThe Writer’s Adventure Guide: 12 Stages to Writing Your Book, and Overcome Writer’s Block. She’s recently released Twitter For Authors: Social Media Book Marketing Strategies for Shy Writers, the subject of her national and international talks.
She’s been a columnist and editor at “The National Networker,” and a contributing author to several anthologies, including “Writing Romance,” a bestseller, and “Creativity Coaching Success Stories.”
She was the editor of “When I Was There,” the bestselling anthology of stories about life at UC Berkeley, 1960-2010, and is also the editor for the bestseller, “Honest Medicine: Effective, Time-Tested, Inexpensive Treatments for Life-Threatening Diseases” by Julia Schopick.
Beth Barany is now the editor and publisher of the “Author Entrepreneurship Magazine,” to help authors build and maintain successful careers.
Beth speaks to groups and conferences all over the San Francisco Bay Area, across the United States, and internationally. Typically who she works with are authors who ready to get their books completed and out into the world.



Section #5: Words of Wisdom
BRoP:  Tell us about your route to success – how/when did you decide to self-publish? Did you query an agent first? How did you handle the editing, proofreading, cover design, etc.

Beth:  In January 2011, I decided to self-publish Henrietta The Dragon Slayer after several years of sending out about 50 agent and editor queries and only getting nibbles, and after seeing some of my romance writing friends, and Amanda Hocking, do well as self-published authors. I handle editing with my critique groups and beta readers. I hired a proofreader, and my husband did the cover design. I did hire a cover designer to also help with some of the tech aspects my husband didn’t know how to do at the time that book came out.

BRoP:  What are the most important elements of good writing?

Beth:  Good story telling, a strong compelling voice and characters, good writing craft, and heart.

BRoP:  What tools are must-haves for writers?

Beth:  Besides a good space to write, and the best writing implement a girl could have — a laptop — writers need strong network of people who know the biz and can give you honest feedback on your writing, your cover, and your book blurb. In lieu of the traditional gatekeepers (agents, editors, book buyers), we self-published authors have to act as gatekeepers for each other. Other must-haves: a sense of humor, a thick skin, and the ability to have perspective, oh, and self-discipline.

BRoP:  Do you have any advice for other writers?

Beth:  Yes, 3 things. #1: Write. #2: Write. And #3: Keep writing. Okay, I borrowed that from someone, I’m sure. Writers needs perseverance, a strong support network, and plenty of things to feed the creative soul. And write what you love, whether you love writing for the market, against the market, or ignoring the market; that’s up to you.


BRoP:  What do you feel is the key to your success?

Beth:  Well, that depends on how you define success. Success for me has been to write a compelling delicious novel that people want more of. I feel I have finally reached that based on the reviews of Henrietta The Dragon Slayer and the Grand Prize I received in 2012 from the California Indie Fiction Challenge. The key to success for me has been committing to the story above all, above my precious words, and trusting my intuition to know what the story is I want to tell, then working hard to make sure I offer a compelling delicious experience. You could say that my touchstone to create the success I desire is imagining that experience of sinking into the story and forgetting yourself and the whole world so that you can be a new person for a little while. I know what this is like as an avid reader; I want to give that experience to my readers. That is what drives me to write in the first place.

BRoP:  Do you have anything specific that you want to say to your readers?

Beth:  I hope you enjoy my stories as much as I enjoy writing them!

BRoP:  What are your current / future project(s)?

Beth:  I’m drafting book 3 of my YA fantasy series; and I’m planning on completing my YA paranormal novel by the end of the year. I have a paranormal romance novella coming out in an anthology soon, and I’m working on a paranormal romance series involving modern day knights and the women they’re sworn to protect.

BRoP:  Is there anything else you’d like to share?

Beth:  Here's how you can get in touch with me and learn more about my books.

Contact Information: Beth Barany, Email: beth@bethbarany.com

Is your book in print, ebook or both? Both!

 Don't forget to check out the rest of the Blog Ring of Power interview with my fellowship. 



Part 1 - Monday, March 11th @ Sandra Ulbrich Almazon - http://ulbrichalmazan.blogspot.com/2013/03/blog-ring-of-power-beth-barany.html
Part 4 - Thursday, March 14th @ T.W. Fendley - http://twfendley.com/?p=3185

Thursday, March 7, 2013

Could, Would, Should

These three words are killing my writing career. Only because I'm letting them. We all know that to be a writer is to write.  Just write.  It's not about how good you are(well, at least not at first), or how many words you can type a minute. It's about getting those words up on the screen. It's not about thinking about writing, or dreaming of what it's like to be a writer.  If you write, then you are a writer.  Simple isn't it.

But what then?

My dreams are to have my stories read.  I love when someone looks at what I've written and gives me honest feedback. (Good and Bad) So what is my goal in getting published? Readership.  I have a bit of that in my blog and Facebook.  Though that is far from the same.  I want to be able to write something that others will enjoy.  That is my goal.  I guess I could just do the whole, self-pub and set up my writing for free on Amazon.  I do write stories in this blog after all.  Though I have no idea if anyone likes them.  I know a couple of you look at them, but that's about it.

So what's stopping me from just getting my work out there?  Those three words.  Could, Would, Should.  or in short, FEAR.

I Could enter that contest, if I had the money... courage to enter.
I Would write that short story in my head... if I had the time.
I Should edit my novel... if I thought I was good enough.

I'm so afraid that I am a terrible writer that I put off the things I enjoy.  Strange to think: I would rather do something I hate, (the dishes) then do something I enjoy, due to the fear of inadequacy.  It's true though.  I've found that many writers have this same bane.  It's the ones who can push through the muck of fear that move on to the sunny planes of published wonder.  So how do you push on.  Well, I can't tell you how you should get over your fears.  However, I know the only way I can do it, is to just do it.

I hold back so much, but after a while, I have no choice but to give into the muse.  Most writers are like that.  No matter how long I stay away, it comes back to me.  It's the force of getting all those wondrous thoughts out of my head and onto a medium. I can't draw so I have to create the pictures with words.

I wont know if I'm as terrible as I think, unless I let someone else see my work.  Fear of the unknown is a paralyzing fear, but an incredible high when you move past it. I've already entered a couple contests.  I received second place in one.  I'm waiting on another to find out if I was worthy of notice.  What I need to do now is enter more.  Then, while I wait, work on my lonely novel and all those short stories that have popped up since NaNoWriMo. Wish me luck.

Good luck to all of you as well.  We all need a push every now and again.

What do you fear?


What do you fear?
 
 
 
 
 
 
  
pollcode.com free polls 


Saturday, March 2, 2013

D&D Survey

I couldn't resist.  It's a long survey but it's quite in depth.  I have to say, it got me thinking about each of my characters.  I may have to do it for each MC and see what comes up.

Here are my results:


You Are A:


Neutral Good Human Druid/Ranger (2nd/2nd Level)



Ability Scores:
Strength- 12
Dexterity- 10
Constitution- 12
Intelligence- 13
Wisdom- 13
Charisma- 13

Alignment:
Neutral Good- A neutral good character does the best that a good person can do. He is devoted to helping others. He works with kings and magistrates but does not feel beholden to them. Neutral good is the best alignment you can be because it means doing what is good without bias for or against order. However, neutral good can be a dangerous alignment when it advances mediocrity by limiting the actions of the truly capable.

Race:
Humans are the most adaptable of the common races. Short generations and a penchant for migration and conquest have made them physically diverse as well. Humans are often unorthodox in their dress, sporting unusual hairstyles, fanciful clothes, tattoos, and the like.

Primary Class:
Druids- Druids gain power not by ruling nature but by being at one with it. They hate the unnatural, including aberrations or undead, and destroy them where possible. Druids receive divine spells from nature, not the gods, and can gain an array of powers as they gain experience, including the ability to take the shapes of animals. The weapons and armor of a druid are restricted by their traditional oaths, not simply training. A druid's Wisdom score should be high, as this determines the maximum spell level that they can cast.

Secondary Class:
Rangers- Rangers are skilled stalkers and hunters who make their home in the woods. Their martial skill is nearly the equal of the fighter, but they lack the latter's dedication to the craft of fighting. Instead, the ranger focuses his skills and training on a specific enemy a type of creature he bears a vengeful grudge against and hunts above all others. Rangers often accept the role of protector, aiding those who live in or travel through the woods. His skills allow him to move quietly and stick to the shadows, especially in natural settings, and he also has special knowledge of certain types of creatures. Finally, an experienced ranger has such a tie to nature that he can actually draw on natural power to cast divine spells, much as a druid does, and like a druid he is often accompanied by animal companions. A ranger's Wisdom score should be high, as this determines the maximum spell level that he can cast.













I Am A: Neutral Good Human Druid/Ranger (2nd/2nd Level)


Ability Scores:

Strength-12

Dexterity-10

Constitution-12

Intelligence-13

Wisdom-13

Charisma-13


Alignment:
Neutral Good A neutral good character does the best that a good person can do. He is devoted to helping others. He works with kings and magistrates but does not feel beholden to them. Neutral good is the best alignment you can be because it means doing what is good without bias for or against order. However, neutral good can be a dangerous alignment when it advances mediocrity by limiting the actions of the truly capable.


Race:
Humans are the most adaptable of the common races. Short generations and a penchant for migration and conquest have made them physically diverse as well. Humans are often unorthodox in their dress, sporting unusual hairstyles, fanciful clothes, tattoos, and the like.


Primary Class:
Druids gain power not by ruling nature but by being at one with it. They hate the unnatural, including aberrations or undead, and destroy them where possible. Druids receive divine spells from nature, not the gods, and can gain an array of powers as they gain experience, including the ability to take the shapes of animals. The weapons and armor of a druid are restricted by their traditional oaths, not simply training. A druid's Wisdom score should be high, as this determines the maximum spell level that they can cast.


Secondary Class:
Rangers are skilled stalkers and hunters who make their home in the woods. Their martial skill is nearly the equal of the fighter, but they lack the latter's dedication to the craft of fighting. Instead, the ranger focuses his skills and training on a specific enemy a type of creature he bears a vengeful grudge against and hunts above all others. Rangers often accept the role of protector, aiding those who live in or travel through the woods. His skills allow him to move quietly and stick to the shadows, especially in natural settings, and he also has special knowledge of certain types of creatures. Finally, an experienced ranger has such a tie to nature that he can actually draw on natural power to cast divine spells, much as a druid does, and like a druid he is often accompanied by animal companions. A ranger's Wisdom score should be high, as this determines the maximum spell level that he can cast.


Find out What Kind of Dungeons and Dragons Character Would You Be?, courtesy of Easydamus (e-mail)





Detailed Results:




Alignment:

Lawful Good ----- XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (22)
Neutral Good ---- XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (26)
Chaotic Good ---- XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (18)
Lawful Neutral -- XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (16)
True Neutral ---- XXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (20)
Chaotic Neutral - XXXXXXXXXXXX (12)
Lawful Evil ----- XXXXXXXX (8)
Neutral Evil ---- XXXXXXXXXXXX (12)
Chaotic Evil ---- XXXX (4)

Law & Chaos:

Law ----- XXXXXXX (7)
Neutral - XXXXXXXXXXX (11)
Chaos --- XXX (3)

Good & Evil:

Good ---- XXXXXXXXXXXXXXX (15)
Neutral - XXXXXXXXX (9)
Evil ---- X (1)

Race:

Human ---- XXXXXXXXXXXXX (13)
Dwarf ---- XXXXXXXX (8)
Elf ------ XXXXXXXX (8)
Gnome ---- XXXXXXXXXXXX (12)
Halfling - XXXXXXXXXXXX (12)
Half-Elf - XXXXXXXXXX (10)
Half-Orc - (0)

Class:

Barbarian - (-2)
Bard ------ (0)
Cleric ---- (-8)
Druid ----- XXXXXXXX (8)
Fighter --- (0)
Monk ------ (-25)
Paladin --- (-21)
Ranger ---- XXXXXXXX (8)
Rogue ----- (-8)
Sorcerer -- XX (2)
Wizard ---- XXXX (4)

View Waiting Room for Hall of Heroes

View Hall of Heroes

Neppyman said, 'Like this survey? Copy, paste, and edit the code to make your own! Please give me credit if you do so, of course,' so I'm giving him his due. ^_^

Friday, March 1, 2013

Blog Ring of Power Presents: Kristi Petersen Schoonover




Hey look, Friday is here!  Everyone's in a great mood because the weekend is right next door! So to make things even better let's check out another author as we gaze at her under the Blog Ring of Power microscope. Mwhahahaha. 

I mean, The Blog Ring of Power would like to welcome Kristi Petersen Schoonover.

HIGHREZKPSchoonoverB&WHdshotHer Pushcart-nominated psychological horror novel Bad Apple has been called “deeply disturbing in the best way possible,” by SciFi Saturday Night. Her short fiction has appeared in Carpe Articulum, The Adirondack Review, Barbaric Yawp, The Illuminata, Morpheus Tales, New Witch Magazine, Toasted Cheese, The Smoking Poet, The Battered Suitcase, and a host of others, including several anthologies. Kristi is the recipient of three Norman Mailer Writers Colony Winter Residencies and is an editor for Read Short Fiction (www.readshortfiction.com). She lives in the Connecticut woods with her housemate, Charles, three cats–Poe, Mikey, and Kali–and her husband, paranormal investigator and occult specialist Nathan Schoonover of The Ghostman & Demon Hunter Show (www.ghostanddemon.com). She has a passion for ghost stories, marine life, and Tarot cards and still sleeps with the lights on.

The Creative Process

BRoP: How do you deal with writer’s block?

Kristi: I don’t believe in writer’s block. If you’re truly a writer, then you’re always absorbing things around you, writing in your head, or future projects are simmering in the darkest recesses of your mind. If you’re not inspired to actually be actively writing, that means your body is in a state of processing. Chill out and do something else. It’ll come out when it’s ready. I’ve lived by this philosophy for years and it’s been great.

BRoP: How do you develop your plots and characters? Do you use any set formula?

Kristi:  I don’t focus on “developing” a character. I just let him talk. As far as plot, I let the characters do all the work—they tell me where they want to go, what they want to do next. If the characters need more shading or are inconsistent, if the pacing’s off, or there’s one scene too many or scenes are missing, all of those items get worked through and repaired during the revision process.

BRoP: Are you a “plotter” or a “pantser” (do you plan/outline the story ahead of time or write “by the seat of your pants”)?

Kristi:  I’m a pantser. Hemingway said “There is nothing to writing. All you do is sit down at a typewriter and bleed.” I believe that’s true—barfing out a story is easy. For me, the real work of the craft is in the revision process. I have banged out a complete 5,000-word short story in as little as an hour or two—but then it’ll sometimes take as long as three years before I feel it’s polished and ready to see the light of day. One story I had a lot of trouble with after it was written took almost 15 years of on-and-off critiquing and revision, but when it was completed and I sent it first and exclusively to the one market I really wanted, I got an acceptance letter within hours.

BRoP: Do you use critique partners or beta readers? Why or why not?
Kristi:  Having critique partners or beta readers is a given. Constructive criticism is the only way to grow, the only way to really improve and learn, and ultimately, the quality of what you put out is better. It’s more than worth the time, even if it delays submission by three or four months. The glut of markets looking for work and the ease of self-publishing is a wonderful thing, but one of the issues that’s arisen is that writers are so eager to send their stuff out or slap it up on Kindle that much of it is not as good as it should be. I've found myself reading submissions for Read Short Fiction or buying someone’s new e-book and seen giant plot holes, the same word used three times in one paragraph, inconsistent characterization, and numerous other issues that are clearly indicative of the fact that no one besides the writer read the piece before it was declared “ready to publish.” Those who don’t seek criticism from strong sources are only hurting themselves in the end.

BRoP: Is there anything you find particularly challenging to write?
Kristi:  Academic and creative nonfiction essays. Although my father taught me the five-paragraph structure well and I've used it my whole life for everything from essays to letters and speeches, this type of writing seems to use a different side of my brain. It’s hard for me to switch modes. That’s why there aren't very many deeply analytical posts on my blog; one of those posts can take me months to write. Sometimes it’s worth it—one I wrote in 2010 called “The Call of the Carnival” still gets a great deal of attention. So, I don’t regret the two-month struggle it took me to pen that one, and I don’t regret the time I spend on the others, because they all do well. It’s just that it’s difficult and time-consuming.

What format is your book(s) available in (print, e-book, audio book, etc.)? 
Bad Apple is available in all formats, both print and e-book, and is available wherever you purchase your books.
Bad Apple
BAD APPLE:  After an unfortunate incident on a Maine apple orchard, precocious teen Scree is left with a father she’s not sure is hers, a never-ending list of chores and her flaky brother’s baby. In a noble move to save the child from an existence like her own, Scree flees to a glitzy resort teeming with young men just ripe for the picking. But even as life with baby becomes all she’d dreamed, Dali-esque visions begin to leach through the gold paint… 
Fans of The Haunting of Hill House, The Lovely Bones, and Carrieshouldn’t miss Bad Apple–a dark, surreal ride that proves not all things in an orchard are safe to pick.

Please let us know where your readers can stalk you:
Goodreads author page: http://www.goodreads.com/kpschoonover
Twitter: @KPSchoonover




Part 1 - Wednesday, February 27th @ Terri Bruce – http://www.terribruce.net 
Part 2 - Thursday, February 28th @ T.W. Fendley - http://twfendley.com/
Part 3 - Friday, March 1st *waves* yup here you are!
Part 4 Monday, March 4th @ Sandra Ulbrich Almazon - http://ulbrichalmazan.blogspot.com/
Part 5 Monday, March 5th @ Dean C. Rich - http://deanswritingtime.blogspot.com/